Anonymous lover of classic vampires, Anne Rice's follower, fan of comics, reader, lover of beautiful things, Jenn Lawrence fan, illustrator by passion.

artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info
artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.
But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”
That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.
- American Psychological Association “Wonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”
Zoom Info

artandcetera:

Evolution of Wonder Woman

The height of comic book popularity coincided with World War II, an era that saw the creation of Superman, Captain America, Batman, Green Lantern and the Flash. In a world ravaged by war, these powerful men fought against the forces of evil. Lionizing the battle of good versus evil was not just for kids: Enlisted men requested comic books in great quantities. In fact, one-fourth of all the magazines military men received during the war were comics.

But what these men found in those comics often reflected their violent lives. Harvard psychologist William Moulton Marston, claimed that “comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity.”

That’s when he struck upon the idea of creating a female superhero who used love as well as strength to conquer evil: Wonder Woman. She made her first appearance in 1941 in All Star Comics #8. Soon after, Wonder Woman won a fan poll as the best new comic book character. This popularity led to her own comic series.

American Psychological AssociationWonder Woman: A Psychologist’s Creation”

annabellioncourt asked:

I KNOW THEY DID IN THAT ONE :D they even kept the awkward Claudia/Louis thing in the first one! But Queen of the Damned took every chance it had to reiterate that Lestat was straight; and I'm just thinking...he made out with Louis before going on stage in the book. Please. Please do not ruin this series.

calantheandthenightingale:

fyeahgothicromance:

I didn’t know they did that in Queen of the Damned. I haven’t watched it. I’ve seen enough small parts to make me not want to watch it. I can’t.

Let’s just hope they get the right people involved.

Queen of the Damned is absolutely horrible in every sense possible— the casting, the music, the costumes, the effects, etc.  (Although Maven’s review kind of makes me appreciate its badness… and at least understand why it turned out so awful.)

If Universal’s plans to adapt the Vampire Chronicles don’t fall through, then I’m hoping that they’ll keep the tone that was established in Interview.  That film struck the right balance when it came to the homoerotic content; it was more than obvious that the characters weren’t exactly “straight,” but it didn’t have to waste time with boring sex scenes to get that across.  And that’s one of my biggest fears with a new adaptation: they’ll over-sex it.  I don’t know about you, but I find suggestive behavior and sexual tension far more interesting than flat out sex scenes, which leave nothing to the imagination.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDSMore on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

Norm